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Programming and Electronics
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File: 1598810274591.jpg (321.89 KB, 1280x720, code review with the girls.jpg)

 No.366[Reply]

What do you look for in a code review?

To be honest I just try to understand the code and the changes, which means that most of the time I point out things that hinder comprehension, like misleading variable names, overly complex approaches, and sometimes bugs in the logic or missing corner cases. But I feel like most of my comments are just nitpicking and I am wasting everyone's time.
2 posts omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.369

>What is job security?

 No.371

>>368
>>369
complacency kills, but at the same time not everything has to be a labor of love. if i'm not getting premium pay i don't generally put out a premium product.
if it's my own project it's a different story though

 No.372

>>368
Do you have a linter hooked up with whatever your team uses for code reviews? If not, do everything you can to get one, it makes everyone's life much easier. But yeah, that sounds miserable.

 No.376

File: 1599173287430.jpg (390.43 KB, 1024x783, reviewing.jpg)

>>371
Yeah no I agree with you. I think I perceive it this way since I'm only at the starting phase of my career and lack the exposure. I know that most pragmatic approach is to save my autism for my personal programming projects, rather than being a nuisance to everyone at work.

>>372
We do actually, but it mostly cleans up formatting errors and gives some warnings about unused variables and such. Not really that helpful. I mostly have a problem with their portrayed disinterest for structure and cleanliness. I perceive their mentality to be something along the lines of: "My first attempt did what it was supposed to, so why take a moment to consider it and possibly iterate it one more time.". That being said I realize that you have to draw the line somewhere. You probably get my point.

That's enough about my complaints. Reiterating OP's question: What do you look for in reviews?

 No.379

>>366
In my last job, I was as picky as you, OP. But when it came to fixing all the findings, we were told to only fix potential bugs, and leave all the violations of the coding style guide in place. I especially hated it, when people write code, that doesn't even fit on a full HD screen with a small font. Like what were they thinking? I would be ashamed to deliver such code. The real fun begins when you try to do diffs side by side with such a mess.

I also felt like i was too picky all the time, because nobody else seemed to care, but on the other hand, this software was low-level code for devices peoples lifes depend on.

You probably don't want to know what shitty code is inside health devices like pacemakers or insuline pumps and what not.



File: 1592149922082.png (2.34 MB, 1500x1997, __tsukino_usagi_and_seiya_….png)

 No.318[Reply]

What makes the graphical interface of proprietary software superior to that of Free Software solutions? I know that people like to complain about GIMP and others, but I got pretty used to it at this point and never used proprietary alternatives. Are they really that much better? What's the difference?

 No.363

The X Window system had a lot of problems but most are solved now really, beyond being sort of complex and "insecure" (doesn't really matter, since Unix-likes are about as insecure anyway). Wayland is supposed to break things down into some D-Bus/XDG/logind nightmare or something, not entirely clear to me, maybe someone knows better here.
Ignoring all other options and going directly for GTK and Qt (Qt isn't nearly as bad as GTK though). GTK and Qt go through major version changes and impose change on programs which creates instability and extra developer work. GNOME has been changing its design paradigm and everyone else has to pick up their turds and deal with it.
GIMP is not even bad other than the fact that it uses GTK. Single window mode, dark mode, GEGL options, Mypaint brushes, its all been default for quite some time now, but Adobe users just won't switch away from an 8 year old program (the pre-cloud version of Photoshop). Never used Photoshop, the most complex proprietary graphics editor I have used is Paint.NET, but GIMP is more capable than that one. Krita is a little easier for painting and drawing but it has a worse text tool last I checked. I remember people whining about CMYK for years, but its in Krita and GIMP now as far as I know (there was a GIMP plugin for CMYK for years). I think they just don't want to learn a new tool, there will always be excuses, but they don't really mean much since these people don't plan to switch ever.

 No.364

>>363
cont'd
I like Eaglemode, graphical Emacs (the X kind without GTK), and some of the X window managers as well as mpv. Links (browser) has a graphical mode but it looks much like the curses interface. Worker is an interesting file manager and a good example of a classic X11 program that never died out, but its a bit too orthodox, so I don't use it.
Once you get away from the big GUI silos trying to replicate some other system semi-successfully, you can see the advantages and disadvantages of the Unix-like approach. Unix-likes don't really care much about graphics so there is a lot of complexity in the whole pile of display technologies. Ideally they're just trying to display a TTY, not a graphical environment with GL acceleration and programs capable of displaying OpenGL or Vulkan stuff with specialized hardware and drivers. It took many years for Mesa/drm (not digital rights management) in the kernel/X to work this well for a lot of people, and there are still problems. Desktop software wise, people had to write a lot of standards, XDG/ICCCM/EMWH and so on, and they're not really seamless or without problems, so its kind of terrible for an Apple, Windows, or BeOS clone. But on Unix-likes, you can have it your way usually, you can have your own window manager of choice that works well for you and can be modified to fit your needs, rice Emacs or Vim or whatever, tile those windows, etc.
Oh and NVIDIA doesn't care much about Linux or other open source platforms so CUDA isn't really as relevant (requires proprietary drivers), and OpenCL usage is limited, so there are less programs using or related to that sort of thing.

 No.365

>>364
>Eaglemode
Good taste.



 No.308[Reply]

How are these videos made? It looks like some kind of animating software and not hand drawn, right?

 No.310

Freaky. I think they draw a couple images and use animation to fill in the rest

 No.358

>>308
AI software. Similar to what's going on with the deepfakes.

 No.359

>>358
This just looks like Live2D to me, same sort of thing as what all those VTubers use. This type of thing doesn't require anywhere near the complexity of deepfakes.



File: 1562862340773.png (443.24 KB, 1200x675, ClipboardImage.png)

 No.104[Reply]

AMD won
2 posts omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.108

That's what I use, so I guess I win too?

 No.172

Using Ryzen AMD CPU as well here.

 No.319

Apple announced that they will be using their own chips; I wonder how that will effect x86's monopoly on desktop computing.

 No.327

>>319
It probably won't. Macs already had compatibility issues with things made for PCs (e.g. Linux), so I doubt widening that gap further will change much. Then again, I tend to be continuously surprised at what kind of cues tech companies take from Apple. Like, it didn't surprise me at all when iPhone abandoned headphone jacks, but I was absolutely baffled when other phone companies followed suit.
If anything breaks the x86 monopoly, I really hope it's something open source like RISC-V and not just companies trying to copy Apple's dumb bullshit. Who am I kidding though, that's not gonna be the case.

 No.350




File: 1595267384087.jpg (256.45 KB, 1716x2362, 8a37c505978b5ace14bb55fe6a….jpg)

 No.337[Reply]

Is GNU Guile's ice-9 module named after Cirno?!

 No.339


 No.340

File: 1595346058806.jpeg (766.64 KB, 800x1260, 16cc7ecc198b4e2aab372683d….jpeg)

>>339
Don't tell me Kurt Vonnegut knew about Cirno??

Is this a good book? Should I read it?

 No.341

>>340
>Don't tell me Kurt Vonnegut knew about Cirno??
I don't know what a Cirno is but if you have a date associated with it you may draw some conclusions by comparing it to the book's date.

>Is this a good book? Should I read it?

As Hugo award nominees go it's on the weakish side, but if you're into social satire with black humor you might give it a rainy afternoon.

 No.342

File: 1595612602397.jpg (49.91 KB, 800x800, b969a7da731d61b20bb399a2ad….jpg)

>>341
Cirno is a character from the Touhou video games. She's an ice fairy who is associated with the number nine (⑨) because she's an idiot.



File: 1581156554049.png (789.07 KB, 761x1066, 86532c04290d84566673d48110….png)

 No.206[Reply]

With the GPL, for any binary that you distribute, you have to make the corresponding source code available. With reproducible builds (see: https://reproducible-builds.org/), it is possible to verify that the binary was indeed compiled from the available source code. All you have to do is to compile the source code yourself, and compare the resulting binary with the one distributed. For an example of this in practice, see guix's `challange` command.

With the AGPL, if you run a service accessible through a network, you have to make the corresponding source code to the service available to the users. But is there a way for the user to verify that the service provided corresponds to the source code available? I can't think of any situation where the service couldn't just simply lie about what it is.

 No.207

Try asking on textboard.org maybe.

 No.208

>>207
Is my thread not welcome here?

 No.210

File: 1581359975763.jpg (73.11 KB, 850x1200, 994779f8f513495c26788a9ebb….jpg)

I believe this to be very important in today's climate where every megacorporation tries to paint themselves to be great supporters of "open source" and many of our organizations are funded by their "generous donations". But the problem is that they don't give a shit about software freedom. Take Visual Studio Code for example. Microsoft used to advertise it as being Open Source, and millions in good faith downloaded binaries of it. Until a careful eye noticed that the source code released as "Visual Studio Code" was different from the binaries released as "Visual Studio Code". In fact, the binaries even have their own license agreement that you have to accept to use them. After being called out on it, Microsoft modified their website and now Visual Studio Code only claims that it was "built on Open Source", as if that was something to be proud of. But the damage has already been done. I think Docker employed (or still employs) similar tricks. The problem is, pushover (so-called "permissive") licenses do not protect you from this trickery at all. With copyleft licenses, the source code of the binary has to be provided. But with pushover licenses, corporations can put some crippled version of their software on Github as bait, and distribute proprietary versions of it in binary form. This is why I think verifying source-to-binary correspondence, enabled by bootstrappable and reproducible builds, is so important.

 No.295

File: 1590608259919.png (210.98 KB, 1102x826, slide 18.png)

>>210
https://media.libreplanet.org/u/libreplanet/m/the-four-free-ums/
There was this talk at LibrePlanet 2020 by someone from the Open Source Initiative(!) about some current practices that companies employ to appear as part of the Free Software movement without actually adhering to the principles of software freedom.



File: 1516668980885.png (364.07 KB, 1920x1080, zJkdm1n.png)

 No.9[Reply]

Netrunner thread

 No.11

>>9
It's still alive?

 No.285

>>11
sadly no

 No.290

The browser, the distro, or the card game?



File: 1581665730308.jpg (153.2 KB, 1348x900, ilovefs-gallery-136.jpg)

 No.212[Reply]

Do you love Free Software? Let's share some Free Software that we love!

 No.213

Yeah boys. some of my (free || open) source software

1. OSs: Debian, Void, Plan9, & OpenBSD
2. Editors: Acme, Emacs, & Sam

W8.
Here is a list:
https://github.com/mayfrost/guides/blob/master/ALTERNATIVES.md

 No.214

File: 1581836737405.jpg (22.84 KB, 480x360, 1464840777557.jpg)

>>212
I wish I could find a cute gf that's into free software, a good OS, and hates smartphones.

 No.215

I am really glad that Anki exists. It saved me from failing out of university.

 No.284

>>213
include gentoo



File: 1589118586436.png (200.87 KB, 652x343, 4bba512cacbc14d7e081cf1e43….png)

 No.271[Reply]

Would it be possible to have a programming language that is not based on English reach mainstream adoption?
1 post omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.273

The world isn't that cool anymore. At best you'd get something out of China. Scary if they win the AI race.

 No.274

File: 1589266235358.jpg (256.26 KB, 2466x2119, 46b28ab8221945df9cb5542f9a….jpg)

>>272
How about something like APL that manages to avoid the language question altogether?

 No.277

>>274
why would people want to go back to hieroglyphs?

 No.280

File: 1589394544127.jpg (884.85 KB, 960x1280, 81197493_p0.jpg)

>>277
Same reason they use them in maths? Why should programming languages mimic human languages when programs do not behave in any way resembling human thoughts?

 No.281

File: 1589428023532.jpeg (56.66 KB, 312x537, jason.jpeg)

>>280
because humans make it and use it, the machine doesn't care you can make a language based on different dick sizes and it will still take it, but we don't think like that we think and verbalize our thoughts with words, we refined to a point where we can use letters who are easy to grasp and to memorize in a verbal way who can also be used in a number of different variations

square+circle+lain+circle+dildo+triangle= function a
"a" = function a



File: 1588104661337.jpg (1.15 MB, 1000x1415, 42038e231e75cf95c7028cd5f6….jpg)

 No.267[Reply]

Let's collect here programming books that are unusual in some sense, be it their approach, presentation, or simply just quality.

 No.268

File: 1588105017883-0.png (508.75 KB, 674x881, The_Little_Schemer_4th_2.png)

File: 1588105017883-1.png (106.59 KB, 640x833, example.png)

The Little Schemer (and its continuations) have a very nice dialogue-like structure to them, which takes a bit of practice to read effectively, but once you are used to it, is a delight to read. The examples it use are very fun, too. I was told that it is an example of "programmed instruction" but other books labelled programmed instruction are nowhere near this masterpiece.

 No.269

File: 1588105789691.jpg (34.29 KB, 386x500, Functional C.jpg)

This is a textbook written for students whose introductory programming class used a functional programming language, the concrete examples are in SML. It teaches C and imperative programming through translating functional programs into efficient and idiomatic C programs. Sometimes the translations are quite formal, other times somewhat heuristic.



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