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Programming and Electronics
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File: 1595267384087.jpg (256.45 KB, 1716x2362, 8a37c505978b5ace14bb55fe6a….jpg)

 No.337[Reply]

Is GNU Guile's ice-9 module named after Cirno?!

 No.339


 No.340

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>>339
Don't tell me Kurt Vonnegut knew about Cirno??

Is this a good book? Should I read it?

 No.341

>>340
>Don't tell me Kurt Vonnegut knew about Cirno??
I don't know what a Cirno is but if you have a date associated with it you may draw some conclusions by comparing it to the book's date.

>Is this a good book? Should I read it?

As Hugo award nominees go it's on the weakish side, but if you're into social satire with black humor you might give it a rainy afternoon.

 No.342

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>>341
Cirno is a character from the Touhou video games. She's an ice fairy who is associated with the number nine (⑨) because she's an idiot.



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 No.206[Reply]

With the GPL, for any binary that you distribute, you have to make the corresponding source code available. With reproducible builds (see: https://reproducible-builds.org/), it is possible to verify that the binary was indeed compiled from the available source code. All you have to do is to compile the source code yourself, and compare the resulting binary with the one distributed. For an example of this in practice, see guix's `challange` command.

With the AGPL, if you run a service accessible through a network, you have to make the corresponding source code to the service available to the users. But is there a way for the user to verify that the service provided corresponds to the source code available? I can't think of any situation where the service couldn't just simply lie about what it is.

 No.207

Try asking on textboard.org maybe.

 No.208

>>207
Is my thread not welcome here?

 No.210

File: 1581359975763.jpg (73.11 KB, 850x1200, 994779f8f513495c26788a9ebb….jpg)

I believe this to be very important in today's climate where every megacorporation tries to paint themselves to be great supporters of "open source" and many of our organizations are funded by their "generous donations". But the problem is that they don't give a shit about software freedom. Take Visual Studio Code for example. Microsoft used to advertise it as being Open Source, and millions in good faith downloaded binaries of it. Until a careful eye noticed that the source code released as "Visual Studio Code" was different from the binaries released as "Visual Studio Code". In fact, the binaries even have their own license agreement that you have to accept to use them. After being called out on it, Microsoft modified their website and now Visual Studio Code only claims that it was "built on Open Source", as if that was something to be proud of. But the damage has already been done. I think Docker employed (or still employs) similar tricks. The problem is, pushover (so-called "permissive") licenses do not protect you from this trickery at all. With copyleft licenses, the source code of the binary has to be provided. But with pushover licenses, corporations can put some crippled version of their software on Github as bait, and distribute proprietary versions of it in binary form. This is why I think verifying source-to-binary correspondence, enabled by bootstrappable and reproducible builds, is so important.

 No.295

File: 1590608259919.png (210.98 KB, 1102x826, slide 18.png)

>>210
https://media.libreplanet.org/u/libreplanet/m/the-four-free-ums/
There was this talk at LibrePlanet 2020 by someone from the Open Source Initiative(!) about some current practices that companies employ to appear as part of the Free Software movement without actually adhering to the principles of software freedom.



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 No.9[Reply]

Netrunner thread

 No.11

>>9
It's still alive?

 No.285

>>11
sadly no

 No.290

The browser, the distro, or the card game?



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 No.212[Reply]

Do you love Free Software? Let's share some Free Software that we love!

 No.213

Yeah boys. some of my (free || open) source software

1. OSs: Debian, Void, Plan9, & OpenBSD
2. Editors: Acme, Emacs, & Sam

W8.
Here is a list:
https://github.com/mayfrost/guides/blob/master/ALTERNATIVES.md

 No.214

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>>212
I wish I could find a cute gf that's into free software, a good OS, and hates smartphones.

 No.215

I am really glad that Anki exists. It saved me from failing out of university.

 No.284

>>213
include gentoo



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 No.271[Reply]

Would it be possible to have a programming language that is not based on English reach mainstream adoption?
1 post omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.273

The world isn't that cool anymore. At best you'd get something out of China. Scary if they win the AI race.

 No.274

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>>272
How about something like APL that manages to avoid the language question altogether?

 No.277

>>274
why would people want to go back to hieroglyphs?

 No.280

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>>277
Same reason they use them in maths? Why should programming languages mimic human languages when programs do not behave in any way resembling human thoughts?

 No.281

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>>280
because humans make it and use it, the machine doesn't care you can make a language based on different dick sizes and it will still take it, but we don't think like that we think and verbalize our thoughts with words, we refined to a point where we can use letters who are easy to grasp and to memorize in a verbal way who can also be used in a number of different variations

square+circle+lain+circle+dildo+triangle= function a
"a" = function a



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 No.267[Reply]

Let's collect here programming books that are unusual in some sense, be it their approach, presentation, or simply just quality.

 No.268

File: 1588105017883-0.png (508.75 KB, 674x881, The_Little_Schemer_4th_2.png)

File: 1588105017883-1.png (106.59 KB, 640x833, example.png)

The Little Schemer (and its continuations) have a very nice dialogue-like structure to them, which takes a bit of practice to read effectively, but once you are used to it, is a delight to read. The examples it use are very fun, too. I was told that it is an example of "programmed instruction" but other books labelled programmed instruction are nowhere near this masterpiece.

 No.269

File: 1588105789691.jpg (34.29 KB, 386x500, Functional C.jpg)

This is a textbook written for students whose introductory programming class used a functional programming language, the concrete examples are in SML. It teaches C and imperative programming through translating functional programs into efficient and idiomatic C programs. Sometimes the translations are quite formal, other times somewhat heuristic.



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 No.245[Reply]

https://www.acm.org/articles/bulletins/2020/march/dl-access-during-covid-19

You can download any paper from ACM for free, until June 30, 2020! Quickly grab what you couldn't even find on sci-hub!

Don't know what to read? The Computing Surveys journal is full of papers that give an overview to the state of the art in many topics, it's always a good way to discover new problems, challenges and solutions: https://dl.acm.org/journal/csur

Happy learning!

 No.255

Yo, there’s also Library Genesis for textbook PDFs. It’s fucking great.



File: 1520648129111.png (459.91 KB, 1080x1080, Cute_Fish_Fauna.png)

 No.16[Reply]

Have you heard of Hy?
It's Lisp that works like Python.
You can access Python libraries even.
What do you think of it?
6 posts and 3 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.227

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>>226
>Is the format even the same for CPython, PyPy and other Python interpreters? Sorry for the questions, I have no idea how it works.
https://docs.python.org/3/glossary.html#term-bytecode
"""Python source code is compiled into bytecode, the internal representation of a Python program in the CPython interpreter. The bytecode is also cached in .pyc files so that executing the same file is faster the second time (recompilation from source to bytecode can be avoided). This “intermediate language” is said to run on a virtual machine that executes the machine code corresponding to each bytecode. Do note that bytecodes are not expected to work between different Python virtual machines, nor to be stable between Python releases.

A list of bytecode instructions can be found in the documentation for the dis module."""

https://docs.python.org/3/library/dis.html
"""The dis module supports the analysis of CPython bytecode by disassembling it. The CPython bytecode which this module takes as an input is defined in the file Include/opcode.h and used by the compiler and the interpreter.

CPython implementation detail: Bytecode is an implementation detail of the CPython interpreter. No guarantees are made that bytecode will not be added, removed, or changed between versions of Python. Use of this module should not be considered to work across Python VMs or Python releases."""

>I was hoping for something more detailed

https://github.com/python/cpython/blob/3.8/Python/compile.c

 No.228

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>>227
Looks like I just need to RTFM. Do they somewhere also explain why they decided to keep the bytecode implementation defined?

 No.229

File: 1583201092528.jpg (746.8 KB, 1280x1920, 3241784.jpg)

>>228
I'm not aware of a direct statement of the rationale behind that decision – it's not in e.g. the Design and History FAQ [0]. The spirit of The Python Language Reference suggests that it was specified in terms of an abstract execution model [1] precisely to allow more freedom for Alternate Implementations [2].

[0] https://docs.python.org/3/faq/design.html
[1] https://docs.python.org/3/reference/executionmodel.html
[2] https://docs.python.org/3/reference/introduction.html#alternate-implementations

 No.234

>>224
When running a python program, the following steps are taken:
Python source code -> abstract syntax tree (AST) -> bytecode
Hy replaces the "Python source code -> AST" step.

We should note that bytecode is an implementation detail.
CPython has its own format, Jython compiles to JRE bytecode, and other implementations can use more complicated means such as running and compiling simultaneously (JIT compilation).


>>226
>Maybe they do it like this because there's no portable bytecode format?
It's simpler if you just replace the "source code -> AST" step.
AST is the ideal model to compile your code to
because it is the same level of abstraction as it's input (source code).
You can easily see create and run your own AST with python's ast library.
It's pretty trivial to even implement a simple language yourself using that library.

 No.236

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>>234
Doesn't it make a lot of optimizations impossible to do? Since you are basically translating your semantics into sugar-free Python.



File: 1582356754580.jpg (39.73 KB, 500x352, 1576393747453-0.jpg)

 No.219[Reply]

Does anyone have a link for the source code of the Antidepressant CSS theme?

 No.220




File: 1523256594186.jpg (38.14 KB, 400x527, surf-the-web.jpg)

 No.17[Reply]

What browsers do you guys use to surf the web?
I use firefox developer edition so i can install my won addons.

What other tools do you use to get around the net?
31 posts and 3 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.141

>>140
No, have you?

 No.142

>>141
I haven't yet. But I may decide to give it a try in the next day or two. More or less have been curious about it in the meanwhile.

 No.173

>>140
>Opera
No.

 No.189

I'm still happy with Firefox. There's some minor nuisances, but overall I find it pretty good.

 No.190

>>189
Same, I'm happy with Firefox for the most part. But I am interested in trying something new. I'd like to eventually replace it with something a lot better for my overall needs.



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